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Taos Ski Valley

NOTE: Descriptions that are in italics were taken either from the respective website or from another indicated source.

THE BLOND BEAR TAVERN & CAFE NARANJA

The Blonde Bear Tavern & Café NaranjaJon Mudder, spending his first season in Taos Ski Valley, is introducing the restaurant's new menu. Jon hails from the critically acclaimed BELLAVITAE in New York's Greenwich Village, where he was Executive Chef and owner. Joining Jon are Chefs Sophia Vigil and Josh Tate. Rounding out the team is Wine Manager and Mixologist Rushan Perera.
Phone: (575) 737-6995 

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Village of Arroyo Seco

Arroyo Seco (aka locally as "Seco") is a village on the way to the Taos Ski Valley, about half-way between the intersection of US 64/SH 150 and Casa de Toro. Besides the interesting shops that are worth browsing through, Seco has four restaurants, all within easy walking distance of each other.

NOTE: Descriptions that are in italics were taken either from the respective website or from another indicated source.

ABE'S CANTINA Y COCINA

Some people might consider Abe's Cantina y Cocina a dive, but it has the best hamburgers, tamales, burritos, etc. around.  On one side of the small building is a bar and on the other is a grocery store and restaurant.  Abe's is located on the main road (NM 150) that goes through Seco.  Give it a try!
Phone: 575-8643

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Town of Taos

There are about 75 places to eat in and around the Town of Taos.  Here is a broad sampling of them.

NOTE: Descriptions that are in italics were taken either from the respective website or from another indicated source.

ORLANDO'S NEW MEXICAN CAFE

Festivity reigns in this spicy little cafe on the north end of town. Serving some of northern New Mexico's best chile, this place has colorful tables set around a bustling open kitchen and airy patio dining during warmer months. Service is friendly but minimal. Try the Los Colores, their most popular dish, with three enchiladas (chicken, beef, and cheese) smothered in chile and served with beans and posole (a Mexican stew). The taco salad is another favorite. Portions are big here, and you can order a Mexican or microbrew beer, or a New Mexican or California wine. - Frommer's Review
Phone: 575-751-1450

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Skiing

Taos Ski Valley, the granddaddy of all New Mexico skiing areas, opened in 1957.  The resort has some of the most challenging slopes in the country with a majority of expert rated slopes. Hint: To get the most out of your skiing, be sure to pay attention to the signs at the base of each lift.  They show the waiting waiting times at the other lifts.

Here is the Taos Ski Valley skiing site that has all of the information you need to have a fabulous time skiing and/or snowboarding at TSV.  Casa-de-Toro is only 3.5 miles from the slopes.

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Fishing Near Taos

There are several rivers, streams, and lakes to fish in the Taos area.  All, except for the Canadian River, have cold-water fish (trout and Kokanee salmon) only.  For specific information, be sure to review the New Mexico 2011 - 2012 Fishing Rules and Information or check out the New Mexico state wildlife fishing website.

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Hiking/Horseback Riding/Snowshoeing

There are 8 principal hiking trails in the Taos Ski Valley.  Some are appropriate for horseback riding (contact A.A. Taos Ski Valley Wilderness Adventures for more information) and for snowshoeing during the winter. The trails are listed according to their proximity to the Taos Ski Valley resort.  In other words, Yerba is the first trail you encounter when you enter the valley, Manzanita is the second, etc., while The Wheeler Peak/Bull-of-the-Woods Trail starts at the resort parking lot.   By the way, many descriptions mention "Twining".  Twining was a small abandoned copper mining town that was abandoned before a fire burned down the mill in 1932. The resort is built on the site of old town.  For a complete list of trails in the 1.5 million acres of the Carson National Forest, click here.

NOTE: Italicized text is trail information from the U.S. Forest Service description of that particular trail.

Hiking in the Carson National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service recommends the following when you go or are planning on going hiking in the Carson National Forest:

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Carson National Forest When Snow Is On The Hills

The following is a brochure published by the U.S. Forest Service describing winter in the Carson National Forest.

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Wheeler Peak/Bull-of-the Woods

In the summer months the trail is used for hiking and horseback riding. In the Winter the trails are used for cross country skiing and snowshoeing.

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Williams Lake

In the summer months the trail is used for hiking and horseback riding. In the Winter the trail is used for cross country skiing and snowshoeing.

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Gold Hill

The US Forest Service does not provide a description of this trail.  However, there is a sign in the Bull of the Woods pasture that identifies the start of the trail (TR 64).  It runs for about 3.5 miles from the pasture and ends at the top of Gold Hill.  At about 2.5 miles, it intersects with the Long Canyon Trail.

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Long Canyon

In the summer months trail can be used for hiking and horseback riding. In the winter months the trail is used for cross country skiing and snowshoeing.

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Gavilan

In the summer months trail can be used for hiking and horseback riding. Trail is used in the winter for snowshoeing.

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Italianos Canyon

In the summer months trail can be used for hiking and horseback riding. In the winter months the trail is used for snowshoeing.

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Manzanita Canyon

In the summer months trail can be used for hiking and horseback riding. In the winter months the trail is used for snowshoeing.

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Yerba Canyon

Access:
One mile east (up the hill) from Upper Cuchilla Campground which is located on State Highway 150, the road to Taos Ski Valley. Parking is available at the trail head located at the end of the short access road.

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Hunting Near Taos

There are plenty of opportunities to hunt large game around Taos and Casa de Toro.  The state of New Mexico has divided the state into 69 Game Management Units with the Taos area in GMU 53.   To print the state map, click here; to print the GMU 53 map, click here.  Here, a hunter can go for elk, mule deer, big horn sheep, mountain lion (cougar), and black bear.  For specific information, be sure to review the New Mexico Big Game & Fur Bearer Rules & Information or check out the New Mexico state wildlife hunting website.

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Whitewater Rafting/Kayaking

The website Paddling the Taos Box describes what it's like to take a raft down the Taos Box area of the Rio Grande:

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Taos Art Galleries and Artist Studios

The Taos art galleries feature traditional and contemporary fine art: Native American art and pottery, Southwest art, glass art, prints, sculpture, photography, and other types of visual art.  If you're at all interested in collecting, or just viewing, art while visiting Taos, here are some galleries and studios you might find interesting.

Art Museums and Historical Places

Taos art museums abound with the art of famous artists from both Taos and around the world.

The Taos area is rich in history - natural, archeological, anthropological, geopolitical, and art.  There are historical places and museums that help tell the story of Taos from its earliest days as a home to the Taos pueblo indians through the time Spanish settlers through the Civil War to New Mexico's statehood.
 
 

Spas and Salons

Taos has numerous ways to relax in the water and to be pampered while you're visiting.  There are day spas in Taos, resort spas in Taos and nearby, and a couple of famous natural hot springs along the Rio Grande River not far from the casa.

Hot Springs

Black Rock Hot Springs are two mud-bottomed rock pools on the west bank of the Rio Grande River, north of Taos and west of Arroyo Hondo. Water temperatures are usually about 97° F. depending on how high the river is. NOTE: Clothing is optional.

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Other Things To Experience

Here is a variety of other activities available in the Taos area.

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